Select an Orthopaedic Specialty and Learn More

Use our specialty filter and search function to find  information about specific orthopaedic conditions, treatments, anatomy, and more, quickly and easily.

GET THE HURT! APP FOR FREE INJURY ADVICE IN MINUTES

Shoreline Orthopaedics and the HURT! app have partnered to give you virtual access to a network of orthopaedic specialists, ready to offer guidance for injuries and ongoing bone or joint problems, 24/7/365.

Get Started Now

Browse Specialties

    • Joint Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    AC Joint Inflammation

    The AC (acromioclavicular) joint is formed where a portion of the scapula and clavicle meet and are held together by ligaments that act like tethers to keep the bones in place. Inflammation of the AC joint is a frequent cause of pain in the top portion of the shoulder.

    More Info
    • Arthritis
    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Joint Disorders
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    AC Joint Issues

    Although many things can happen to the AC joint, the most common conditions are fractures, arthritis and separations. When the AC joint is separated, it means that the ligaments are torn and can no longer keep the clavicle and acromion properly aligned. Arthritis in the joint is characterized by a loss of the cartilage that allows bones to move smoothly and is essentially due to wear and tear.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    ACL Injuries & Reconstruction

    One of the most common knee injuries is an ACL sprain or tear. Athletes who participate in high demand sports like soccer, football and basketball are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments. About half of all ACL injuries occur along with damage to other structures in the knee, such as articular cartilage, meniscus, or other knee ligaments.

    More Info
    • Arthritis
    • Foot & Ankle
    • Joint Disorders

    Ankle Arthritis

    Arthritis is inflammation that can cause pain and stiffness in any joint in the body. Osteoarthritis, also known as degenerative or “wear-and-tear” arthritis, is a common problem for many people after reaching middle age. It is often experienced in the small joints of the foot and ankle.

    More Info
    • Hip
    • Joint Disorders
    • Joint Replacement & Revision

    Anterior or Posterior Hip Replacement

    Both the anterior and posterior approaches provide excellent relief of arthritic hip pain and stiffness, as well as providing durable service for up to 15-20 years. At Shoreline Orthopaedics, we know that one approach is not right for everyone. We are equally skilled and experienced in both anterior and posterior approaches to total hip replacement.

    More Info
    • Arthritis
    • Joint Disorders
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)

    Arthritis Overview

    According to estimates, one in every five people living in the United States has signs or symptoms of arthritis in at least one joint. There are many types of arthritis, but most fall into one of two major categories: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, or RA. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States and it affects millions of people. Approximately half of all sufferers are under age 50.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee

    Articular Cartilage Restoration

    Articular cartilage can be damaged by injury or normal wear and tear, resulting in a joint surface that is no longer smooth. Damaged cartilage does not heal itself well, so doctors have developed surgical techniques to stimulate the growth of new cartilage. This procedure is used most commonly for the knee and most candidates are young adults with a single injury or lesion. Restoring articular cartilage can relieve pain, allow improved function, and delay or prevent the onset of arthritis.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Muscle Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    Biceps Tendinitis

    Inflammation of a tendon is called tendinitis. An inflammation or irritation of the upper biceps tendon is called long head of biceps tendinitis. Inflammation is the body’s natural response to injury, disease, overuse or degeneration, and it often causes swelling, pain or irritation.

    More Info
    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders
    • Muscle Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Biceps Tendon Tear at the Elbow

    Most often caused by sudden injury, a biceps tendon tear at the elbow tends to result in greater arm weakness than injuries to the biceps tendon at the shoulder. Without use of the biceps tendon, other arm muscles will make bending the elbow possible, however, these muscles cannot fulfill all elbow functions.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Muscle Disorders
    • Pediatric Injuries

    Bone, Joint & Muscle Infections in Children

    Children can develop “deep” infections in their bones (osteomyelitis), joints (septic arthritis), or muscles (pyomyositis). The most common locations for deep muscle infections are the large muscle groups of the thigh, groin and pelvis. Children who have infections of their bones, joints, or muscles often have fever, pain, and limited movement of the infected area.

    More Info
    • Foot & Ankle
    • Joint Disorders

    Bunions

    A bunion is a bump on the MTP joint, on the inner border of the foot. Bunions are made of bone and soft tissue, covered by skin that may be red and tender. Prolonged wearing of poorly fitting shoes is by far the most common cause of bunions, especially styles that feature a narrow, pointed toe box that squeezes the toes into an unnatural position. Bunions also have a strong genetic component.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Muscle Disorders
    • Shoulder

    Chronic Shoulder Instability

    Chronic shoulder instability is the persistent inability of these tissues to keep the arm centered in the shoulder socket, so the shoulder is loose and slips out of place repeatedly. Once a shoulder has dislocated, or the shoulder’s ligaments, tendons and muscles become loose or torn, that shoulder is vulnerable to repeated dislocations.

    More Info
    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders

    Elbow (Olecranon) Bursitis

    Normally, the olecranon bursa is flat. However, if it becomes irritated or inflamed, more fluid accumulates in the bursa causing elbow bursitis to develop. Elbow bursitis can occur for a number of reasons, including trauma, prolonged pressure, infections, or certain medical conditions.

    More Info
    • Arthritis
    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders

    Elbow Arthritis

    Elbow arthritis is a common cause of elbow pain and stiffness, but is less common than arthritis in other joints of the body. Arthritis is the loss of the normal protective cartilage that covers the bones. When this cartilage or “padding” of the bone breaks down and is lost, areas of raw bone become exposed. When large areas of bone are exposed, they grind against each other with standing and walking. This is “bone on bone” arthritis and is usually painful.

    More Info
    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders
    • Minimally Invasive Surgery (Arthroscopy)

    Elbow Arthroscopy

    Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used by orthopaedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose and treat problems inside the joint. Your doctor may recommend elbow arthroscopy if you have a painful condition that does not respond to nonsurgical treatments such as rest, physical therapy and medications or injections to reduce inflammation.

    More Info
    • Hip
    • Joint Disorders
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)
    • Sports Medicine

    Femoral Acetabular Impingement (FAI) & Labral Tear of the Hip

    When bones of the hip are abnormally shaped and do not fit together perfectly, the hip bones may rub against each other and cause damage to the joint. The resulting condition is femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), which is frequently seen along with a tear of the labrum.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Shoulder

    Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)

    In frozen shoulder, also called adhesive capsulitis, the tissues of the shoulder capsule become thick, stiff and inflamed. Stiff bands of tissue (adhesions) develop and, in many cases, there is a decrease in the synovial fluid needed to lubricate the joint properly. Over time the shoulder becomes extremely difficult to move, even with assistance. Frozen shoulder generally improves over time, however it may take up to 3 years

    More Info
    • Hand & Wrist
    • Joint Disorders

    Ganglion Cyst

    A ganglion cyst is a fluid-filled mass or lump. Although they can develop in various locations, the most common location is on the back of the wrist. Ganglion cysts are not cancerous. In most cases, ganglion cysts are harmless and do not require treatment. If, however, the cyst becomes painful, interferes with function, or has an unacceptable appearance, several treatment options are available.

    More Info
    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Golfer’s Elbow (Medial Epicondylitis)

    Medial epicondylitis, often known as golfer’s elbow, is a painful condition that occurs when overuse results in inflammation of the tendons that join the forearm muscles to the inside of the bone at the elbow.

    More Info
    • Foot & Ankle
    • Joint Disorders

    Hallux Rigidus (Stiff Big Toe)

    Hallux rigidus usually develops in adults 30-60 and occurs most commonly at the base of the big toe, or MTP joint. When articular cartilage in the MTP joint is damaged by wear-and-tear or injury, the raw bone ends can rub together and a spur, or overgrowth, may develop on the top of the bone. Because the MTP joint must bend with each step, hallux rigidus can make walking painful and difficult.

    More Info
    • Arthritis
    • Hand & Wrist
    • Joint Disorders

    Hand & Wrist Arthritis

    There are many small joints in the hand and wrist that work together to produce the fine motion necessary to perform detailed tasks such as threading a needle or tying a shoelace. When one or more of these joints is affected by arthritis, even simple activities can become difficult. Although there are many types of arthritis, most fall into one of two major categories: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, or RA.

    More Info
    • Arthritis
    • Hip
    • Joint Disorders
    • Joint Replacement & Revision

    Hip Arthritis

    Hip arthritis is a leading cause of hip pain and stiffness. Arthritis is the loss of the normal protective cartilage that covers the bones. When this cartilage or “padding” of the bone breaks down and is lost, areas of raw bone become exposed. When large areas of bone are exposed, they grind against each other with standing and walking. This is “bone on bone” arthritis and is usually painful.

    More Info
    • Hip
    • Joint Disorders
    • Minimally Invasive Surgery (Arthroscopy)

    Hip Arthroscopy

    Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used by orthopedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose and treat a wide range of problems inside the joint. During hip arthroscopy, a small camera (arthroscope) is inserted into the hip joint and images from inside the hip are displayed on a video monitor.

    More Info
    • Hip
    • Joint Disorders
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)

    Hip Bursitis (Trochanteric Pain Syndrome)

    Hip bursitis is typically the result of inflammation and irritation in one of two major bursae in the hip. One covers the bony point of the hip bone (greater trochanter). Inflammation of this bursa is known as trochanteric bursitis.

    More Info
    • Hip
    • Joint Disorders

    Hip Osteonecrosis

    Osteonecrosis of the hip is a painful condition that develops when the blood supply to the femoral head is disrupted. Without adequate nourishment, the bone in the head of the femur dies and gradually collapses. This causes the articular cartilage covering the hip bones to also collapse, leading to disabling arthritis and destruction of the hip joint.

    More Info
    • Hip
    • Joint Disorders
    • Joint Replacement & Revision

    Hip Resurfacing

    During hip resurfacing, unlike total hip replacement, the femoral head (ball) is not removed. Instead, it is left in place, where it is trimmed and capped with a smooth metal covering. In both procedures, however, the damaged bone and cartilage within the acetabulum (socket) is removed and replaced with a metal shell.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Jumper’s Knee

    Repetitive contraction of the quadriceps muscles in the thigh can stress the patellar tendon where it attaches to the kneecap, causing inflammation and tissue damage (patellar tendinitis). For a child, this repetitive stress on the tendon can irritate and injure the growth plate, resulting in a condition referred to as Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease.

    More Info
    • Arthritis
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)

    Knee Arthritis

    The knee is one of the most commonly involved joints with arthritis. Arthritis is the loss of the normal protective cartilage that covers the bones. When this cartilage or “padding” of the bone breaks down and is lost, areas of raw bone become exposed and grind against each other with standing and walking. This is “bone on bone” arthritis and is usually painful.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Minimally Invasive Surgery (Arthroscopy)

    Knee Arthroscopy

    Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used by orthopaedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose and treat problems inside the joint. Your doctor may recommend knee arthroscopy if you have a painful condition that does not respond to nonsurgical treatments such as rest, physical therapy, and medications or injections to reduce inflammation.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee

    Knee Osteonecrosis

    Osteonecrosis, which literally means “bone death,” is a painful condition that develops when a segment of bone loses its blood supply and begins to die. Osteonecrosis of the knee most often occurs in the knobby portion of the thighbone, on the inside of the knee (medial femoral condyle). It may also occur on the outside of the knee (lateral femoral condyle) or on the flat top of the lower leg bone (tibial plateau).

    More Info
    • Arthritis
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee

    Knee Osteotomy

    Osteotomy literally means “cutting of the bone.” When early-stage osteoarthritis has damaged just one side of the knee joint, or when malalignment of the knee causes increased stress to ligaments or cartilage, a knee osteotomy may be performed to reshape either the tibia (shinbone) or femur (thighbone) to relieve pressure on the joint.

    More Info
    • Arthritis
    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Loose Body in the Elbow

    Loose bodies are small fragments of bone or cartilage that have broken off inside a joint. As these fragments float free within the elbow, they can cause pain and even get caught in the moving parts of the joint.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Sports Medicine

    Meniscal Tears

    Meniscal tears are among the most common knee injuries. When tearing a meniscus, you may hear a “popping” noise. Most people can still walk on the injured knee, and athletes often continue to play immediately following a tear. However, without proper treatment, a piece of meniscus may come loose and drift into the joint, worsening symptoms.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD)

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a joint condition that occurs when a small segment of bone separates from its surrounding region due to a lack of blood supply. As a result, the bone segment and cartilage covering it begin to crack and loosen. OCD develops most often in children and adolescents, frequently in the knee, at the end of the femur (thighbone).

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Joint Replacement & Revision
    • Knee

    Partial Knee Replacement

    Unicompartmental (or partial) knee replacement is an option for a small percentage of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee that is limited to a single compartment of the knee. During this procedure, only the damaged compartment is replaced with metal and plastic, while the healthy cartilage and bone in the rest of the knee is left alone.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)
    • Sports Medicine

    Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner’s Knee)

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a broad term used to describe pain in the front of the knee and around the kneecap. Although it can occur in nonathletes, it is sometimes called “runner’s knee” or “jumper’s knee” because it is most common in people who participate in sports—particularly females and young adults.

    More Info
    • Elbow
    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Joint Disorders

    Radial Head Fractures of the Elbow

    Although attempting to break a fall with outstretched hands may be an instinctive response, the force of the impact can travel up the forearm and result in a dislocated elbow or break in the radius, which often occurs in the radial head.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Neck and Back (Spine)
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)

    Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction (SI Joint Pain)

    Sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SI joint pain) is a painful condition resulting from improper or abnormal movement of the sacroiliac joints. Generally more common in young and middle-aged women, sacroiliac joint dysfunction can cause inflammation of the joints (sacroiliitis), as well as pain that occurs in the lower back, buttocks or legs.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Minimally Invasive Surgery (Arthroscopy)
    • Shoulder

    Shoulder Arthroscopy

    Shoulder arthroscopy may relieve the painful symptoms of many problems that damage the rotator cuff tendons, labrum, articular cartilage, or other soft tissues surrounding the joint. This damage may be the result of an injury, overuse, or age-related wear and tear.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    Shoulder Dislocation

    A dislocated shoulder occurs when the head of the upper arm bone (humerous) is either partially or completely out of its socket (glenoid). Whether it is a partial dislocation (subluxation) or the shoulder is completely dislocated, the result can be pain and unsteadiness in the shoulder.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    Shoulder Impingement

    Rotator cuff pain commonly causes tenderness in the front and side of the shoulder. There may be pain and stiffness when lifting the arm, or when lowering the arm from an elevated position.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Joint Replacement & Revision
    • Shoulder

    Shoulder Replacement

    In shoulder replacement surgery, the damaged parts of the shoulder are removed and replaced with artificial components, called prosthesis. Options include replacement of only the ball (head of the humerus bone), or replacement of both the ball and the socket (glenoid).

    More Info
    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Joint Disorders
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    Shoulder Separation (AC Joint Sprain)

    A shoulder separation is actually an injury to the AC joint, not the shoulder joint. It is commonly the result of a direct fall onto the shoulder that injures the ligaments that surround and stabilize the AC joint.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    SLAP Tear

    A SLAP (Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior) tear is an injury to the top (or superior) part of the labrum. SLAP tears can be the result of acute trauma, or repetitive overhead sports, such as throwing athletes or weightlifters, have an increased risk of injury to the superior labrum. Many SLAP tears are the result of a wearing down of the labrum that occurs slowly over time.

    More Info
    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

    Lateral epicondylitis, more commonly known as tennis elbow, is a painful condition that occurs when overuse results in inflammation of the tendons that join the forearm muscles on the outside of the elbow. Recent studies show that tennis elbow is often due to damage to the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), a specific forearm muscle that helps stabilize the wrist when the elbow is straight.

    More Info
    • Hip
    • Joint Disorders
    • Joint Replacement & Revision

    Total Hip Replacement (Hip Arthroplasty)

    In a total hip replacement, or total hip arthroplasty, the damaged bone and cartilage is removed and replaced with prosthetic components. Many different types of designs and materials are currently used in artificial hip joints. Your surgeon will recommend the most appropriate implants and surgical approach for your needs.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Joint Replacement & Revision
    • Knee

    Total Knee Replacement (Knee Arthroplasty)

    People who benefit from total knee replacement surgery often experience one or more of the following: severe knee pain or stiffness that limits everyday activities; difficulty walking more than a few blocks without pain or support; moderate or severe pain while resting, day or night; chronic knee inflammation and swelling that does not improve with rest or medication; knee deformity; failure to substantially improve with treatments.

    More Info
    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders

    Ulnar Nerve Entrapment at the Elbow (Cubital Tunnel Syndrome)

    Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow, or cubital tunnel syndrome, occurs when the ulnar nerve in the arm becomes compressed or irritated. Although there are various areas where the ulnar nerve can become constricted, such as at the collarbone or wrist, it occurs most commonly behind the inside of the elbow.

    More Info
    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee

    Unstable Kneecap (Patella Instability) Procedures

    In a normal knee, the kneecap fits nicely in the femoral groove, allowing you to walk, run, sit, stand, and move easily. But if the groove is uneven or too shallow, the kneecap can slide off, resulting in a partial or complete dislocation. A sharp blow to the kneecap, as in a fall, can also pop the kneecap out of place. When this happens, the MPFL is usually torn and this makes it more likely for it to happen again.

    More Info
    • Hand & Wrist
    • Joint Disorders
    • Minimally Invasive Surgery (Arthroscopy)

    Wrist Arthroscopy

    Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used by orthopaedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose and treat problems inside the joint. Your doctor may recommend wrist arthroscopy if you have a painful condition that does not respond to nonsurgical treatments.

    More Info
    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Hand & Wrist
    • Joint Disorders
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Wrist Sprains

    Sprained wrists are often caused by a fall, such as onto an outstretched hand, or when the joint is bent forcefully or suddenly twisted. Wrist sprains are graded according to the degree of injury to the ligaments, and they can range from mild to severe.

    More Info