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    • Joint Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    AC Joint Inflammation

    The AC (acromioclavicular) joint is formed where a portion of the scapula and clavicle meet and are held together by ligaments that act like tethers to keep the bones in place. Inflammation of the AC joint is a frequent cause of pain in the top portion of the shoulder.

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    • Arthritis
    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Joint Disorders
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    AC Joint Issues

    Although many things can happen to the AC joint, the most common conditions are fractures, arthritis and separations. When the AC joint is separated, it means that the ligaments are torn and can no longer keep the clavicle and acromion properly aligned. Arthritis in the joint is characterized by a loss of the cartilage that allows bones to move smoothly and is essentially due to wear and tear.

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    • Foot & Ankle
    • Sports Medicine

    Achilles Tendinitis

    Inflammation of a tendon is called tendinitis. Achilles tendinitis is a common condition that causes pain along the back of the leg, near the heel. Although the Achilles tendon can withstand great stresses from running and jumping, it is also prone to tendinitis.

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    • Foot & Ankle
    • Sports Medicine

    Achilles Tendon Rupture

    An Achilles tendon rupture is a complete or partial tear that occurs when the Achilles tendon is stretched beyond its capacity. Forceful jumping or pivoting, or sudden accelerations of running, can overstretch the tendon and cause a tear. An injury to the tendon can also result from falling or tripping.

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    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    ACL Injuries & Reconstruction

    One of the most common knee injuries is an ACL sprain or tear. Athletes who participate in high demand sports like soccer, football and basketball are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments. About half of all ACL injuries occur along with damage to other structures in the knee, such as articular cartilage, meniscus, or other knee ligaments.

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    • Foot & Ankle
    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Sports Medicine

    Ankle Sprain

    When a ligament is forced to stretch beyond its normal range, a sprain occurs. A severe sprain causes actual tearing of the elastic fibers of the ligament. A sprained ankle is a very common injury that produces pain and swelling.

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    • Joint Disorders
    • Muscle Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    Biceps Tendinitis

    Inflammation of a tendon is called tendinitis. An inflammation or irritation of the upper biceps tendon is called long head of biceps tendinitis. Inflammation is the body’s natural response to injury, disease, overuse or degeneration, and it often causes swelling, pain or irritation.

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    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders
    • Muscle Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Biceps Tendon Tear at the Elbow

    Most often caused by sudden injury, a biceps tendon tear at the elbow tends to result in greater arm weakness than injuries to the biceps tendon at the shoulder. Without use of the biceps tendon, other arm muscles will make bending the elbow possible, however, these muscles cannot fulfill all elbow functions.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Neck and Back (Spine)
    • Sports Medicine

    Cervical Fracture (Broken Neck)

    A cervical fracture (broken neck) is a fracture or break that occurs in one of the seven cervical vertebrae. Following an acute neck injury, patients may experience shock and/or paralysis, as well as bruising or swelling at the back of the neck. Conscious patients may experience severe neck pain, but this is not necessarily the case.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Knee
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Collateral Ligament Injuries (MCL, LCL)

    Knee ligament sprains or tears are a common sports injury, and the MCL is injured more often than the LCL. The MCL is the most commonly injured ligament in the knee. However, due to the complex anatomy of the outside of the knee, an injury to the LCL usually includes injury to other structures in the joint, as well. Athletes who participate in direct contact sports like football or soccer are more likely to injure their collateral ligaments.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Knee
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Combined Knee Ligament Injuries

    Because the knee joint relies just on ligaments and surrounding muscles for stability, it is easily injured. Direct contact to the knee or hard muscle contraction, such as changing direction rapidly while running, can injure a knee ligament. It is possible to injure two or more ligaments at the same time. Multiple injuries can have serious complications, such as disrupting blood supply to the leg or affecting nerves that supply the limb’s muscles.

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    • Muscle Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Contusions or Bruises

    Muscle contusions, or bruises, are second only to strains as a leading cause of sports injuries. Most contusions are minor and heal quickly, without requiring the athlete to be removed from the game. However, severe contusions can cause deep tissue damage, which may lead to complications and/or keep the athlete out of sports for months.

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    • Muscle Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Cramps or Charley Horse

    A charley horse, or cramp, is an involuntary, forcibly contracted muscle that does not relax, resulting in sudden and intense pain. Cramps can affect any muscle under your voluntary control (skeletal muscle), and can involve part or all of a muscle, or several muscles in a group. The most commonly affected muscle groups are: back of the lower leg/calf (gastrocnemius), back of the thigh (hamstrings), and front of the thigh (quadriceps).

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    • Diagnostics & Durable Medical Equipment (DME)
    • Sports Medicine

    DARI 3D Motion Capture Scan

    DARI Motion gives us deeper insight into your motion health by allowing us to see and measure your ability to move from different perspectives within minutes. By identifying specific areas that need more attention, DARI helps us provide a more personalized, targeted plan of care.

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    • Hip
    • Joint Disorders
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)
    • Sports Medicine

    Femoral Acetabular Impingement (FAI) & Labral Tear of the Hip

    When bones of the hip are abnormally shaped and do not fit together perfectly, the hip bones may rub against each other and cause damage to the joint. The resulting condition is femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), which is frequently seen along with a tear of the labrum.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Sports Medicine

    Fractures

    A fracture is a broken bone. Although bones are rigid, they do bend with limited flexibility when outside force is applied. When that force is too great, the bone will fracture. Common causes of fractures include: trauma, such as auto or sports-related accidents; osteoporosis, which can weaken the bone; or overuse caused by repetitive motion that can tire muscles and place excess force on the bone, resulting in stress fractures like those most often seen in athletes.

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    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Golfer’s Elbow (Medial Epicondylitis)

    Medial epicondylitis, often known as golfer’s elbow, is a painful condition that occurs when overuse results in inflammation of the tendons that join the forearm muscles to the inside of the bone at the elbow.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Growth Plate Fractures

    A child’s long bones do not grow from the center outward. Instead, growth occurs in the growth plates—areas of developing cartilage located near the ends of long bones. The growth plate regulates growth and helps determine the length and shape of the mature bone. A child’s bones heal faster than an adult’s so it is extremely important for your child’s injured bone to receive proper treatment immediately, before it can begin to heal.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Muscle Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Hamstring Injuries

    A hamstring muscle injury can be a pull, a partial tear, or a complete tear. Occurring frequently in athletes, these injuries are especially common for participants in sports that require sprinting, such as track, soccer or basketball. Most hamstring injuries occur in the thick part of the muscle or where the muscle fibers join tendon fibers.

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    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    High School Sports Injuries

    Teenage athletes are injured at approximately the same rate as professional athletes, but because they are often still growing, it is extremely important seek proper treatment immediately. A child’s bones grow at a different rate of speed from that of muscles and tendons. This uneven growth pattern makes younger athletes more susceptible to muscle and tendon injuries, and growth plate fractures.

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    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Jumper’s Knee

    Repetitive contraction of the quadriceps muscles in the thigh can stress the patellar tendon where it attaches to the kneecap, causing inflammation and tissue damage (patellar tendinitis). For a child, this repetitive stress on the tendon can irritate and injure the growth plate, resulting in a condition referred to as Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease.

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    • Arthritis
    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Loose Body in the Elbow

    Loose bodies are small fragments of bone or cartilage that have broken off inside a joint. As these fragments float free within the elbow, they can cause pain and even get caught in the moving parts of the joint.

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    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Sports Medicine

    Meniscal Tears

    Meniscal tears are among the most common knee injuries. When tearing a meniscus, you may hear a “popping” noise. Most people can still walk on the injured knee, and athletes often continue to play immediately following a tear. However, without proper treatment, a piece of meniscus may come loose and drift into the joint, worsening symptoms.

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    • Foot & Ankle
    • Hand & Wrist
    • Sports Medicine

    Nerve Injuries

    Injury to a nerve can stop signals to and from the brain, resulting in a loss of feeling in the injured area and causing the muscles to stop working properly. Nerves are fragile and can be damaged by pressure, stretching, or cutting.

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    • Knee
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Osgood-Schlatter Disease

    In Osgood-Schlatter disease, children have pain at the front of the knee due to inflammation of the growth plate (tibial tubercle) at the upper end of the shinbone (tibia). When a child participates in sports or other strenuous activities, the quadriceps muscles of the thigh pull on the patellar tendon which, in turn, pulls on the tibial tubercle. In some children, this repetitive traction on the tubercle leads to the inflammation, swelling and tenderness of an overuse injury.

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    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD)

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a joint condition that occurs when a small segment of bone separates from its surrounding region due to a lack of blood supply. As a result, the bone segment and cartilage covering it begin to crack and loosen. OCD develops most often in children and adolescents, frequently in the knee, at the end of the femur (thighbone).

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    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Overuse Injuries in Children

    Although the benefits of athletic activity are significant, young athletes are at greater risk for injury than adults because they are still growing. Some children play on multiple team sat the same time while others participate in one sport, all year long. Repetitive use of the same muscle groups places unchanging stress to specific areas of the body, leading to muscle imbalances that, when combined with overtraining and inadequate rest periods, can put children at serious risk for overuse injuries.

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    • Knee
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Patella Tendinitis & Patella Tendinosis

    Pain in the patella tendon is a common problem, especially in people who participate extensively in running or jumping activities. Pain in the patella tendon can be separated into two main conditions: patella tendinitis and patella tendinosis.

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    • Joint Disorders
    • Knee
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)
    • Sports Medicine

    Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner’s Knee)

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a broad term used to describe pain in the front of the knee and around the kneecap. Although it can occur in nonathletes, it is sometimes called “runner’s knee” or “jumper’s knee” because it is most common in people who participate in sports—particularly females and young adults.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Knee
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    PCL Injuries & Reconstruction

    Injuries to the posterior cruciate ligament are not as common as other knee ligament injuries. They are often subtle and more difficult to evaluate than other ligament injuries in the knee. Many times a posterior cruciate ligament injury occurs along with injuries to other structures in the knee, such as cartilage, other ligaments, and bone.

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    • Foot & Ankle
    • Sports Medicine

    Peroneal Tendon Injuries

    Basic types of peroneal tendon injuries are tendinitis, acute and degenerative tears, and subluxation. Peroneal tendon injuries occur most commonly in individuals who participate in sports that involve repetitive or excessive ankle motion. People with higher arches have an increased risk for developing peroneal tendon injuries.

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    • Foot & Ankle
    • Sports Medicine

    Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is one of the most common problems of the foot and ankle. It occurs when the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, which impairs the tendon’s ability to provide stability and support for the arch of the foot, resulting in flatfoot.

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    • Minimally Invasive Surgery (Arthroscopy)
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    Rotator Cuff Tear & Arthroscopic Repair

    When one or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the head of the humerus. As damage progresses, lifting a heavy object or other similar action can result in a complete tear of the tendon. A torn rotator cuff weakens the shoulder, making it painful and difficult to perform simple daily activities such as getting dressed or combing your hair.

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    • Foot & Ankle
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Sever’s Disease

    Sever’s disease (also known as osteochondrosis or apophysitis) is an inflammatory condition of the growth plate in the heel bone (calcaneus). One of most common causes of heel pain in children, Sever’s Disease often occurs during adolescence when children hit a growth spurt.

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    • Joint Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    Shoulder Dislocation

    A dislocated shoulder occurs when the head of the upper arm bone (humerous) is either partially or completely out of its socket (glenoid). Whether it is a partial dislocation (subluxation) or the shoulder is completely dislocated, the result can be pain and unsteadiness in the shoulder.

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    • Joint Disorders
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    Shoulder Impingement

    Rotator cuff pain commonly causes tenderness in the front and side of the shoulder. There may be pain and stiffness when lifting the arm, or when lowering the arm from an elevated position.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Joint Disorders
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    Shoulder Separation (AC Joint Sprain)

    A shoulder separation is actually an injury to the AC joint, not the shoulder joint. It is commonly the result of a direct fall onto the shoulder that injures the ligaments that surround and stabilize the AC joint.

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    • Joint Disorders
    • Shoulder
    • Sports Medicine

    SLAP Tear

    A SLAP (Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior) tear is an injury to the top (or superior) part of the labrum. SLAP tears can be the result of acute trauma, or repetitive overhead sports, such as throwing athletes or weightlifters, have an increased risk of injury to the superior labrum. Many SLAP tears are the result of a wearing down of the labrum that occurs slowly over time.

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    • Neck and Back (Spine)
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R)
    • Sports Medicine

    Spondylolysis & Spondylolisthesis

    Many people with spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis do not experience obvious symptoms or pain. Often, a patient visits the doctor for activity-related lower back pain, only to be surprised by the diagnosis. Patients may experience what feels like a muscle strain, with pain that spreads across lower back, and is sometimes accompanied by leg pain. Spondylolisthesis can also cause spasms that stiffen the back and tighten hamstring muscles, resulting in changes to posture and gain.

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    • Sports Medicine

    Sports Medicine Overview

    Sports medicine is a specialty within orthopaedics that treats injuries to bones, joints, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, and muscles. Many of these injuries are sustained during athletic activity, but not all people who experience these injuries are competitive athletes. Therefore, we will develop a treatment plan that makes most sense for each individual.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Muscle Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Sprains & Strains

    A sprain is the stretching or tearing of ligaments that connect one bone to another, often caused by a fall or sudden twisting of a joint. A strain can be a simple stretch in a muscle or tendon (the fibrous cords of tissue that attach muscles to bone), or it can be a partial or complete tear in the muscle-tendon combination.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Sports Medicine

    Stress Fracture

    Stress fractures are common sports injuries that occur due to overuse. As muscles become increasingly fatigued and less able to absorb the added shock of a sports activity, the overload of stress is eventually transferred to the bone, resulting in a tiny crack called a stress fracture.

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    • Elbow
    • Joint Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

    Lateral epicondylitis, more commonly known as tennis elbow, is a painful condition that occurs when overuse results in inflammation of the tendons that join the forearm muscles on the outside of the elbow. Recent studies show that tennis elbow is often due to damage to the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), a specific forearm muscle that helps stabilize the wrist when the elbow is straight.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Muscle Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Thigh Muscle Strain

    Muscle strains usually happen when a muscle is stretched beyond its limit, tearing the muscle fibers. They frequently occur near the point where the muscle joins the tough, fibrous connective tissue of the tendon. A similar injury occurs if there is a direct blow to the muscle. Muscle strains are graded according to their severity.

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    • Elbow
    • Pediatric Injuries
    • Sports Medicine

    Throwing Injuries to the Elbow in Children

    The beginning of baseball season in spring is often followed by an increase in overuse injuries in young baseball players, particularly pitchers and other players who throw repetitively. Two of the most frequent throwing injuries to the elbow are medial apophysitis (little leaguer’s elbow), and osteochondritis dissecans.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Hand & Wrist
    • Sports Medicine

    Thumb Fracture

    Although a fracture can occur anywhere in the thumb, the most serious happen near the joints, especially at the base of the thumb near the wrist. A fractured or broken thumb can be especially difficult because it affects the ability to grasp items. Thumb fractures are usually a result of direct stress, such as from a fall or catching a baseball without a glove.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Hand & Wrist
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Thumb Sprain

    A sprained thumb, or gamekeepers thumb, is an injury to the ulnar collateral ligament. A tear in the ulnar collateral ligament at the base of the thumb will cause instability and discomfort, weakening your ability to pinch and grasp.

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    • Fractures, Sprains & Strains
    • Hand & Wrist
    • Joint Disorders
    • Ligament Disorders
    • Sports Medicine

    Wrist Sprains

    Sprained wrists are often caused by a fall, such as onto an outstretched hand, or when the joint is bent forcefully or suddenly twisted. Wrist sprains are graded according to the degree of injury to the ligaments, and they can range from mild to severe.

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